3 Migraine Facts You Need to Know

Migraine is a prevalent medical condition experienced by 1 in 4 people in the U.S, according to the Migraine Foundation. It also affects 12% of children in the general population. Migraine is the 3rd most prevalent illness globally. It is usually hereditary and affects women more than men. 

Migraine is different from a tension headache. According to our pain management experts in Gainesville, FL, migraines are more severe compared to tension headaches. Patients experience pain on one side of the head, feel nauseous, and more sensitive to light, odor, and sound. Migraine can be triggered by many factors that are not the same for one patient to the next.

Here are other facts about migraines that you need to know.

Migraine can be prevented

The best way to prevent migraines is to avoid triggers. If you’re aware of what’s going to cause your migraine attack, you need to make the necessary changes in your lifestyle, so you don’t have to suffer from this debilitating condition. For some people, this may not be possible.

The good news is, you can resort to vitamin supplementation, which can also effectively prevent migraine episodes, as shown in a study published in the BioMed Research International.

For instance, you may visit our vitamin lounge at Advanced Pain Medical Center, where you can get IV therapy for migraines. A study from the Cleveland Clinic shows that intravenous medication infusions improved the conditions of 40% of patients with painful headaches and dizziness.

Another study has shown that vitamin supplementation has significantly reduced migraine disability by 30% after six months. The frequency and severity of pain were also reduced.

This type of preventive therapy also brings fast relief, especially for patients who often experience cascading symptoms of migraine. IV therapy is affordable, safe, has no side effects, and works effectively for at least a month after the treatment.

Food might not necessarily cause migraines, but hunger could be a major trigger

Artificial sweeteners, beer, chocolates, and MSG-containing foods are known to trigger migraines. However, the science behind this remains inconclusive. But hunger has been a proven trigger for migraine attacks. A study has shown that it prompts the release of CGRP (calcitonin gene-related peptide) protein that causes brain hypersensitivity, inflammation, and pain.

Aura or blurry vision associated with migraines is not common

According to Practical Neurology, only 5.3% of female migraineurs and 1.9 of male migraineurs experience an “aura,” or the flashing of light, or blurry vision before a migraine attack. Some patients might think that they do not have a migraine episode in the absence of this symptom.

The signs and symptoms of migraines differ per patient. Some patients may not experience vomiting, even when they have migraine episodes. Not all migraines can be pulsating or occur only on one side. Some patients might not experience sensitivity to light or dizziness despite having migraines. 

At Advanced Pain Medical Center, we offer effective treatment for patients looking for pain management in Gainesville, FL. We understand that each patient has a unique experience when it comes to pain, so we use a personalized approach in treating the source of pain.

Learn more about our services

If you are suffering from migraines, consult our experts and doctors at Advanced Pain Medical Center for treatments that suit your needs.

We offer various techniques for pain management. These include a rapidly advancing medical specialty that uses a multi-disciplinary strategy for treating all types of pain and improving a patient’s quality of life.

At Advanced Pain Medical Center, we offer high-quality services such as innovative medical marijuana solutions, pain management, and regenerative medicine. Also, we are the only physician-supervised IV vitamin lounge in the area.

For inquiries, contact us or call us at 352-508-8668.

The material contained on this site is for informational purposes only and DOES NOT CONSTITUTE THE PROVIDING OF MEDICAL ADVICE, and is not intended to be a substitute for independent professional medical judgment, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare providers with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your health.